25 May 2013

Convert the Mailto Hyperlinks on your Website into Contact Forms



You can convert the mailto links on your web page into inline contact forms by adding a single line of JavaScript code to your web template.



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Digital Inspiration @labnol This story, Convert the Mailto Hyperlinks on your Website into Contact Forms, was originally published at Digital Inspiration on 25/05/2013 under Forms, GMail, WordPress, Internet.



How to Use Flickr as a Photo Backup Service



Flickr offers 1 TB of free storage space, 200x more than Dropbox or Google Drive, and this should be enough to backup your entire collection of photos online.



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Digital Inspiration @labnol This story, How to Use Flickr as a Photo Backup Service, was originally published at Digital Inspiration on 25/05/2013 under Backup, Flickr, Internet.



Cool Websites and Tools [May 24th 2013]



Check out some of the latest MakeUseOf discoveries. Most of the listed websites are FREE or come with a decent free account option. If you want to have similar cool websites round-ups delivered to your email daily email subscribe here....


The post Cool Websites and Tools [May 24th 2013] appeared first on MakeUseOf.



5 Ways To Search Netflix, Hulu Plus, Amazon And More At Once



If you're still having a hard time deciding which of the online movie streaming services is right for you, one of the most important factors to consider when it comes to making this decision is the selection they offer. Rather than search each service one by one to see if it has the movies or TV shows you like, with the following third party sites, you can search all four (and quite a few more) in one go.


The post 5 Ways To Search Netflix, Hulu Plus, Amazon And More At Once appeared first on MakeUseOf.



Collect, Curate, and Share Movie Lists Using Letterboxd and iPhone App Limelight



I use LibraryThing, GoodReads and my Amazon wish lists to keep track of the books I've read or want to read, but up until a few days ago, I hadn't been keeping track of the movies I watch. I recently decided that I would like to develop a movie library–at least virtually, online. Both the Letterboxd website and recently released Limelight iPhone app offer easy ways to build a movie library and connect with film lovers, critics, and friends.


The post Collect, Curate, and Share Movie Lists Using Letterboxd and iPhone App Limelight appeared first on MakeUseOf.



You Can Now Search Through Your Google+ Photos Straight From Google Search [Updates]



Google has just announced a new search feature, which lets you search within and across your Google+ photo albums from Google Search itself. All you have to do is need sign into the account you use to store your Google+ photo albums and fire away with a keyword. What takes this search technology up a notch is Google's introduction of machine learning and computer vision to the way it recognizes specific photographs.


The post You Can Now Search Through Your Google+ Photos Straight From Google Search [Updates] appeared first on MakeUseOf.



Avoid Window Overload: 5 Great Tools To Manage Multiple Windows



Using the Windows desktop involves managing windows. Some people may use full-screen windows, but power users know that the key to being productive is having multiple windows visible at a time, whether you're using multiple monitors or the side-by-side Aero Snap feature in Windows. Sadly, the Windows desktop still lacks many useful window-management features. However, you can get many great new Windows desktop features by installing third-party utilities.


The post Avoid Window Overload: 5 Great Tools To Manage Multiple Windows appeared first on MakeUseOf.



24 May 2013

How To Try Google Chrome OS On Your PC



How many times have you been approached by a friend or family member who says that they really have very little use for a big, powerful computer, since all they do with it is check email and maybe read a couple of websites every day? The fact is, there area whole lot of people that fall into this category. Computers just aren't a big part of their lives, it's as simple as that. What they really need is an ultra-simple computer.


The post How To Try Google Chrome OS On Your PC appeared first on MakeUseOf.



Protect Your PC With IObit Malware Fighter 2



Malware remains a potential threat for many PC owners. Here at MakeUseOf, we’ve been helping to combat that threat by offering several anti-malware apps free of charge through our Rewards Program. One of those apps has a sequel. IObit Malware Fighter 2 is a major overhaul of the company’s anti-malware app. It adds a variety of features that update the software for modern times, including cloud security and full Windows 8 support. Let’s see how IObit’s new app stacks up.


The post Protect Your PC With IObit Malware Fighter 2 appeared first on MakeUseOf.



Evernote Adds Reminders Feature To Its Web, Mac, and iOS Apps [Updates]



On Thursday, Evernote released a much requested Reminders feature for its popular notebook application. In a blog post, the company says that the new feature includes in-app and email alarms, quick notes based on to-do lists, and the ability to pin notes to the top of your note list — all rolled into one. The new update will be available on Evernote's Web, Mac and iOS versions — for both free and Evernote Business users.


The post Evernote Adds Reminders Feature To Its Web, Mac, and iOS Apps [Updates] appeared first on MakeUseOf.



4+ Ways To Secretly Hide Messages In Pictures



hide messages in picturesWhat is the difference between privacy and secrecy? When something is private, you don’t mind if others know it’s there, as long as they don’t have access to it. For example, other people know you have a credit card number, but as long as they don’t know what it is, they can’t use it.


Ironclad secrecy is when, not only others cannot access it, they don’t even know it’s there. Secret messages have been used since the dawn of man to convey information without interception. Some of the ancient methods I’ve read about include tattooing a message on someone’s head and letting the hair grow back, and encasing messages in balls of wax, which the messenger had to swallow. Later on we had invisible inks, and if you were born anywhere between the 70s and 90s, I’m sure you had your fun with lemon juice, invisible markers, and so on.


The science (or art) of hiding messages in pictures is called steganography, and in the digital age, can be used to hide secret messages in innocent-looking images. Looking at the picture, you have no idea there’s a secret message hiding inside, but with the correct tools or passwords, the secret message can be revealed. As with everything, the digital age made creating these secret messages easier than ever. Want to give it a go? Here are some tools for you to try.


Before We Get Started


If you’ve been reading tech blogs in the last couple of weeks, you’ve probably encountered this ingenious ad by a Spanish organization called the Aid to Children and Adolescents at Risk Foundation (ANAR Foundation). The ad is aimed at both children and adults, but contains a different message for each. From adult height, only a warning is visible; from a child’s height, a phone number appears which the child can call in case of abuse.



While this might not be steganography per se, it’s a great way to convey a secret message only to its target audience, and is a great example of the use of this technique in today’s world.


The DIY Way


If you’re the kind of person that likes to do things himself, this method is as DIY as it gets. You may have to try it several times to find the best picture to hide your message in, but keep in mind that a simple MS Paint (or equivalent) drawing would work best. I tried it with a real photo I took, and it did not work as well.


This method is based on a process I found over on WikiHow, which basically combines two files — an image and a text message — so that on the outside the image looks like an ordinary one, but if you know where to look, you can find the hidden message. If you’re not a Windows user, I apologize in advance, but since I am one, I am only able to show this method on Windows.


To start, find or create a BMP file in any way you wish. For me, the easiest way was to draw something simple and save it as BMP, but you can also try it with a real image. If you go for an image, try to find a relatively small one.


hide messages in pictures


Next, create your message in Notepad or a similar program, and save your message in TXT format. Now it’s time to have some fun. Open Command Prompt, and type in the following:


copy “<image file path>” + “<text file path>” “<new image path>”.


You can get a better idea of what this will look like in the screenshot below.


secret messages in pictures


Name your new image whatever you want, but remember that this is your actual secret message image, so don’t name it “secret message” if you really want it to be a secret. The new image will also be a BMP file, so anyone who sees it will double click it to open and see only the image. If, however, someone in the know opens it using Notepad, they’ll find the secret message hiding all the way at the bottom of the file.


secret messages in pictures


Yes, this might not be the most sophisticated way to do this, but it’s easy and it works.


Mozaiq


Mozaiq is a service aimed at creating those huge mosaics made out of tiny pictures. In addition to that, it also offers a simple and easy-to-use steganography service, which you can use to quickly encrypt any message into an innocent-looking image.


secret messages in pictures


The great thing about Mozaiq is that you don’t even have to spring for an image. If you’re too lazy, or have nothing suitable lying around, Mozaiq will provide a random image for you to hide your message in. All you have to do is input your message and an optional decryption password, and you’re all set.


hidden messages in images


Save this image to your computer (don’t edit it! You can change the file name, though), and send it to whomever you wish. In order to decrypt the message, it’s necessary to use Mozaiq’s decryption page. Upload the image and input the password (if there is one), and voila! Here’s your secret message.


hidden messages in images


Read a full review of Mozaiq (but keep in mind the interface has changed a bit since this was written).


MobileFish


MobileFish is an old-looking website dedicated to design, development, gaming, and stuff in general, but it also features a steganography service. The service is as old-looking as the rest of the site, so you may have to wrestle the interface just a bit, but it does let you hide secret messages in images, and even secret files within files.


hidden messages in images


To create a secret message in an image, upload the image, and then choose whether your secret message will be presented as a secret file or just a message. After uploading the message file or inputting the message, choose a password, and scroll all the way to the bottom. Here you’ll have to enter an easy captcha, and then click on “Encrypt”.


At this point it may look like nothing has happened, but if you scroll down further, you’ll find a download link with your new image.



To decrypt a message, either upload it or enter a URL (which means you can share links to a secret message as well as send the actual file), enter the password, and click on “Decrypt”. Again, it may seem like nothing is happening, but scrolling down will reveal the message either in the Secret message box, or, if you chose to hide the message in a file, it will be available for download using the same Download file link seen above.


MobileFish’s interface is its downfall, but if you and your recipient can put that aside, it’s a great way to create and decipher secret messages.


Secretbook [Chrome]


Secretbook is a fairly new Chrome extension that lets you encode messages into Facebook photos, and then share them with friends as if they were regular photos. Friends in the know and who have the password will be able to decipher the secret message hidden inside the image.


After installing the extension, you’re going to have to refresh Facebook, and press ctrl+alt+a to create a new encrypted message. If this shortcut is taken by something else, as it was for me, there’s not much you can do about it. I ended up shutting down the program that was stealing the shortcut, as there’s currently no way to change it.



Upon hitting the shortcut, the window above will open, where you’ll have to choose an image, and enter the message and a password. Each image can contain a different number of characters, and Secretbook will let you know how long your message can be.


You can then download the file and upload it to Facebook. To decipher the message, press ctrl+alt+a while looking at the picture, and input the password. If the password is correct, the message will be displayed!


hide messages in pictures


(Yes, I know there’s a different message in each screenshot, they’re from different trials!)


More?


There are other tools you can use to create hidden messages in images. S-Tools for Windows and iSteg for Mac are two such examples we’ve covered in the past, and if you’re looking for desktop apps to create your secret messages, these are great ones to try.


Did you manage to create some hidden messages? Which is your favorite method? Do you know of an excellent way I didn’t mention? Tell us everything in the comments.


Image Credit: encrypted message image via Shutterstock


The post 4+ Ways To Secretly Hide Messages In Pictures appeared first on MakeUseOf.



4+ Ways To Secretly Hide Messages In Pictures



hide messages in picturesWhat is the difference between privacy and secrecy? When something is private, you don’t mind if others know it’s there, as long as they don’t have access to it. For example, other people know you have a credit card number, but as long as they don’t know what it is, they can’t use it.


Ironclad secrecy is when, not only others cannot access it, they don’t even know it’s there. Secret messages have been used since the dawn of man to convey information without interception. Some of the ancient methods I’ve read about include tattooing a message on someone’s head and letting the hair grow back, and encasing messages in balls of wax, which the messenger had to swallow. Later on we had invisible inks, and if you were born anywhere between the 70s and 90s, I’m sure you had your fun with lemon juice, invisible markers, and so on.


The science (or art) of hiding messages in pictures is called steganography, and in the digital age, can be used to hide secret messages in innocent-looking images. Looking at the picture, you have no idea there’s a secret message hiding inside, but with the correct tools or passwords, the secret message can be revealed. As with everything, the digital age made creating these secret messages easier than ever. Want to give it a go? Here are some tools for you to try.


Before We Get Started


If you’ve been reading tech blogs in the last couple of weeks, you’ve probably encountered this ingenious ad by a Spanish organization called the Aid to Children and Adolescents at Risk Foundation (ANAR Foundation). The ad is aimed at both children and adults, but contains a different message for each. From adult height, only a warning is visible; from a child’s height, a phone number appears which the child can call in case of abuse.



While this might not be steganography per se, it’s a great way to convey a secret message only to its target audience, and is a great example of the use of this technique in today’s world.


The DIY Way


If you’re the kind of person that likes to do things himself, this method is as DIY as it gets. You may have to try it several times to find the best picture to hide your message in, but keep in mind that a simple MS Paint (or equivalent) drawing would work best. I tried it with a real photo I took, and it did not work as well.


This method is based on a process I found over on WikiHow, which basically combines two files — an image and a text message — so that on the outside the image looks like an ordinary one, but if you know where to look, you can find the hidden message. If you’re not a Windows user, I apologize in advance, but since I am one, I am only able to show this method on Windows.


To start, find or create a BMP file in any way you wish. For me, the easiest way was to draw something simple and save it as BMP, but you can also try it with a real image. If you go for an image, try to find a relatively small one.


hide messages in pictures


Next, create your message in Notepad or a similar program, and save your message in TXT format. Now it’s time to have some fun. Open Command Prompt, and type in the following:


copy “<image file path>” + “<text file path>” “<new image path>”.


You can get a better idea of what this will look like in the screenshot below.


secret messages in pictures


Name your new image whatever you want, but remember that this is your actual secret message image, so don’t name it “secret message” if you really want it to be a secret. The new image will also be a BMP file, so anyone who sees it will double click it to open and see only the image. If, however, someone in the know opens it using Notepad, they’ll find the secret message hiding all the way at the bottom of the file.


secret messages in pictures


Yes, this might not be the most sophisticated way to do this, but it’s easy and it works.


Mozaiq


Mozaiq is a service aimed at creating those huge mosaics made out of tiny pictures. In addition to that, it also offers a simple and easy-to-use steganography service, which you can use to quickly encrypt any message into an innocent-looking image.


secret messages in pictures


The great thing about Mozaiq is that you don’t even have to spring for an image. If you’re too lazy, or have nothing suitable lying around, Mozaiq will provide a random image for you to hide your message in. All you have to do is input your message and an optional decryption password, and you’re all set.


hidden messages in images


Save this image to your computer (don’t edit it! You can change the file name, though), and send it to whomever you wish. In order to decrypt the message, it’s necessary to use Mozaiq’s decryption page. Upload the image and input the password (if there is one), and voila! Here’s your secret message.


hidden messages in images


Read a full review of Mozaiq (but keep in mind the interface has changed a bit since this was written).


MobileFish


MobileFish is an old-looking website dedicated to design, development, gaming, and stuff in general, but it also features a steganography service. The service is as old-looking as the rest of the site, so you may have to wrestle the interface just a bit, but it does let you hide secret messages in images, and even secret files within files.


hidden messages in images


To create a secret message in an image, upload the image, and then choose whether your secret message will be presented as a secret file or just a message. After uploading the message file or inputting the message, choose a password, and scroll all the way to the bottom. Here you’ll have to enter an easy captcha, and then click on “Encrypt”.


At this point it may look like nothing has happened, but if you scroll down further, you’ll find a download link with your new image.



To decrypt a message, either upload it or enter a URL (which means you can share links to a secret message as well as send the actual file), enter the password, and click on “Decrypt”. Again, it may seem like nothing is happening, but scrolling down will reveal the message either in the Secret message box, or, if you chose to hide the message in a file, it will be available for download using the same Download file link seen above.


MobileFish’s interface is its downfall, but if you and your recipient can put that aside, it’s a great way to create and decipher secret messages.


Secretbook [Chrome]


Secretbook is a fairly new Chrome extension that lets you encode messages into Facebook photos, and then share them with friends as if they were regular photos. Friends in the know and who have the password will be able to decipher the secret message hidden inside the image.


After installing the extension, you’re going to have to refresh Facebook, and press ctrl+alt+a to create a new encrypted message. If this shortcut is taken by something else, as it was for me, there’s not much you can do about it. I ended up shutting down the program that was stealing the shortcut, as there’s currently no way to change it.



Upon hitting the shortcut, the window above will open, where you’ll have to choose an image, and enter the message and a password. Each image can contain a different number of characters, and Secretbook will let you know how long your message can be.


You can then download the file and upload it to Facebook. To decipher the message, press ctrl+alt+a while looking at the picture, and input the password. If the password is correct, the message will be displayed!


hide messages in pictures


(Yes, I know there’s a different message in each screenshot, they’re from different trials!)


More?


There are other tools you can use to create hidden messages in images. S-Tools for Windows and iSteg for Mac are two such examples we’ve covered in the past, and if you’re looking for desktop apps to create your secret messages, these are great ones to try.


Did you manage to create some hidden messages? Which is your favorite method? Do you know of an excellent way I didn’t mention? Tell us everything in the comments.


Image Credit: encrypted message image via Shutterstock


The post 4+ Ways To Secretly Hide Messages In Pictures appeared first on MakeUseOf.



4+ Ways To Secretly Hide Messages In Pictures



hide messages in picturesWhat is the difference between privacy and secrecy? When something is private, you don’t mind if others know it’s there, as long as they don’t have access to it. For example, other people know you have a credit card number, but as long as they don’t know what it is, they can’t use it.


Ironclad secrecy is when, not only others cannot access it, they don’t even know it’s there. Secret messages have been used since the dawn of man to convey information without interception. Some of the ancient methods I’ve read about include tattooing a message on someone’s head and letting the hair grow back, and encasing messages in balls of wax, which the messenger had to swallow. Later on we had invisible inks, and if you were born anywhere between the 70s and 90s, I’m sure you had your fun with lemon juice, invisible markers, and so on.


The science (or art) of hiding messages in pictures is called steganography, and in the digital age, can be used to hide secret messages in innocent-looking images. Looking at the picture, you have no idea there’s a secret message hiding inside, but with the correct tools or passwords, the secret message can be revealed. As with everything, the digital age made creating these secret messages easier than ever. Want to give it a go? Here are some tools for you to try.


Before We Get Started


If you’ve been reading tech blogs in the last couple of weeks, you’ve probably encountered this ingenious ad by a Spanish organization called the Aid to Children and Adolescents at Risk Foundation (ANAR Foundation). The ad is aimed at both children and adults, but contains a different message for each. From adult height, only a warning is visible; from a child’s height, a phone number appears which the child can call in case of abuse.



While this might not be steganography per se, it’s a great way to convey a secret message only to its target audience, and is a great example of the use of this technique in today’s world.


The DIY Way


If you’re the kind of person that likes to do things himself, this method is as DIY as it gets. You may have to try it several times to find the best picture to hide your message in, but keep in mind that a simple MS Paint (or equivalent) drawing would work best. I tried it with a real photo I took, and it did not work as well.


This method is based on a process I found over on WikiHow, which basically combines two files — an image and a text message — so that on the outside the image looks like an ordinary one, but if you know where to look, you can find the hidden message. If you’re not a Windows user, I apologize in advance, but since I am one, I am only able to show this method on Windows.


To start, find or create a BMP file in any way you wish. For me, the easiest way was to draw something simple and save it as BMP, but you can also try it with a real image. If you go for an image, try to find a relatively small one.


hide messages in pictures


Next, create your message in Notepad or a similar program, and save your message in TXT format. Now it’s time to have some fun. Open Command Prompt, and type in the following:


copy “<image file path>” + “<text file path>” “<new image path>”.


You can get a better idea of what this will look like in the screenshot below.


secret messages in pictures


Name your new image whatever you want, but remember that this is your actual secret message image, so don’t name it “secret message” if you really want it to be a secret. The new image will also be a BMP file, so anyone who sees it will double click it to open and see only the image. If, however, someone in the know opens it using Notepad, they’ll find the secret message hiding all the way at the bottom of the file.


secret messages in pictures


Yes, this might not be the most sophisticated way to do this, but it’s easy and it works.


Mozaiq


Mozaiq is a service aimed at creating those huge mosaics made out of tiny pictures. In addition to that, it also offers a simple and easy-to-use steganography service, which you can use to quickly encrypt any message into an innocent-looking image.


secret messages in pictures


The great thing about Mozaiq is that you don’t even have to spring for an image. If you’re too lazy, or have nothing suitable lying around, Mozaiq will provide a random image for you to hide your message in. All you have to do is input your message and an optional decryption password, and you’re all set.


hidden messages in images


Save this image to your computer (don’t edit it! You can change the file name, though), and send it to whomever you wish. In order to decrypt the message, it’s necessary to use Mozaiq’s decryption page. Upload the image and input the password (if there is one), and voila! Here’s your secret message.


hidden messages in images


Read a full review of Mozaiq (but keep in mind the interface has changed a bit since this was written).


MobileFish


MobileFish is an old-looking website dedicated to design, development, gaming, and stuff in general, but it also features a steganography service. The service is as old-looking as the rest of the site, so you may have to wrestle the interface just a bit, but it does let you hide secret messages in images, and even secret files within files.


hidden messages in images


To create a secret message in an image, upload the image, and then choose whether your secret message will be presented as a secret file or just a message. After uploading the message file or inputting the message, choose a password, and scroll all the way to the bottom. Here you’ll have to enter an easy captcha, and then click on “Encrypt”.


At this point it may look like nothing has happened, but if you scroll down further, you’ll find a download link with your new image.



To decrypt a message, either upload it or enter a URL (which means you can share links to a secret message as well as send the actual file), enter the password, and click on “Decrypt”. Again, it may seem like nothing is happening, but scrolling down will reveal the message either in the Secret message box, or, if you chose to hide the message in a file, it will be available for download using the same Download file link seen above.


MobileFish’s interface is its downfall, but if you and your recipient can put that aside, it’s a great way to create and decipher secret messages.


Secretbook [Chrome]


Secretbook is a fairly new Chrome extension that lets you encode messages into Facebook photos, and then share them with friends as if they were regular photos. Friends in the know and who have the password will be able to decipher the secret message hidden inside the image.


After installing the extension, you’re going to have to refresh Facebook, and press ctrl+alt+a to create a new encrypted message. If this shortcut is taken by something else, as it was for me, there’s not much you can do about it. I ended up shutting down the program that was stealing the shortcut, as there’s currently no way to change it.



Upon hitting the shortcut, the window above will open, where you’ll have to choose an image, and enter the message and a password. Each image can contain a different number of characters, and Secretbook will let you know how long your message can be.


You can then download the file and upload it to Facebook. To decipher the message, press ctrl+alt+a while looking at the picture, and input the password. If the password is correct, the message will be displayed!


hide messages in pictures


(Yes, I know there’s a different message in each screenshot, they’re from different trials!)


More?


There are other tools you can use to create hidden messages in images. S-Tools for Windows and iSteg for Mac are two such examples we’ve covered in the past, and if you’re looking for desktop apps to create your secret messages, these are great ones to try.


Did you manage to create some hidden messages? Which is your favorite method? Do you know of an excellent way I didn’t mention? Tell us everything in the comments.


Image Credit: encrypted message image via Shutterstock


The post 4+ Ways To Secretly Hide Messages In Pictures appeared first on MakeUseOf.



Google Discontinues Google Checkout, Offers Google Wallet Instead [Updates]



Google Checkout is the next Google service to be discontinued, and will be closing shop on November 20th. The payment gateway will cease operations in favor of Google Wallet. Google Checkout is a PayPal alternative for Web merchants, and also the favored transaction medium for Google Play developers. Google expects the transition to be smooth as it announced its focus on Google Wallet as the new medium of commerce.


To offset the closure of Checkout, Google will continue to support Google Play developers by automatically transitioning them to the Google Wallet Merchant Center. Meanwhile, merchants selling physical goods who do not have a payment processing option, can opt for one of the solutions offered by Google through its partnerships with Braintree, Shopify and Freshbooks, and enjoy discounted migration rates. Merchants selling digital goods can transition to Google Wallet. Shoppers can use Google Wallet to make purchases on merchant apps and sites, as well as on Google Play and the Chrome Web Store.


A few more details can be found on this announcement page which breaks down the options for you.



Google is trying to build up Google Wallets as a viable player in the digital commerce space. Google Wallet was improved with features like an Instant Buy API for faster purchases, and a new Wallet Objects API for better customer engagement with discounts and coupons. We can expect more changes as this year draws to a close.


Does this change affect you? How do you feel about losing Google Checkout?


Source: Google Commerce Blog


The post Google Discontinues Google Checkout, Offers Google Wallet Instead [Updates] appeared first on MakeUseOf.



23 May 2013

Twitter Introduces Login Verification Via SMS For A More Secure Sign-In Process [Updates]



Twitter has announced a new security feature which resembles the two-factor authentication offered on websites such as Facebook, Google, and Dropbox. The new feature makes sure that the person logging into your Twitter account is really you, helping you protect your account from phishing and other security breaches.


The new authentication method utilizes your cell phone, making sure you’re really you by sending you a code via text message, which you will have to enter every time you log into Twitter. To activate the secure sign-in, head over to your Twitter Settings page and scroll down to find the new “Require a verification code when I sign in” option. In order to check the option, you’re going to need to add a cell phone number to your Twitter account.



Once your phone number is added and verified, enable the code verification, and you’re done. Unlike other websites that offer a similar feature, Twitter’s two-factor authentication is limited to text messaging, and doesn’t make use of designated apps such as Google Authenticator.


In addition, it seems that Twitter is not yet set up to support this feature worldwide. When I tried enabling it for my account using my local cell phone, I got an error message telling me my carrier was not yet supported, and that I should hold tight and wait until it is. If your carrier is supported, however, this I a feature worth enabling to protect your account from unwanted logins. Just keep in mind that every time you log in to Twitter, you’re going to need your cell phone handy to type in the code.



Will you enable Twitter’s new login verification?


Source: Twitter Blog


The post Twitter Introduces Login Verification Via SMS For A More Secure Sign-In Process [Updates] appeared first on MakeUseOf.



What Changes Do You Want To See In Windows 8.1? [We Ask You]



Microsoft released Windows 8 last year to a barrage of criticism from people who didn’t like the wholesale changes made to the operating system. The Metro UI was particularly hated because it forced desktop users to navigate or bypass a screen of live tiles primarily aimed at those with touchscreens or tablets. This one element is still hated in some quarters, though many more have since got used to the new user interface.


Microsoft had legitimate reasons for building Windows 8 the way it did, but it has also listened to feedback from users and is preparing to release a major update previously codenamed Windows Blue. Windows 8.1, as it’s officially known, will be released before the year is out, with a public preview available on June 26. Your hopes for this update form the basis for this week’s ‘We Ask You‘ column.


This Week’s Question…


We want to know, What Changes Do You Want To See In Windows 8.1? It’s heavily rumored that the Start button will be making a comeback in Windows 8.1, making Windows 8 much more tolerable for those who still use a keyboard and mouse.


Other changes suggested by the leaking of confidential builds include more customization options for the live tiles on the Start screen, better multi-tasking in the Metro environment, new in-built apps, and new technologies being added. But what changes do you personally want to see in Windows 8.1?



If you’re a Windows 8 user already then this question will be easy to answer. Just let us know what frustrations you feel when using Windows 8: Is there one aspect of the operating system that makes you angry? What components or methods make you wonder what Microsoft was thinking when they designed Windows 8 that way?


If you need some inspiration then feel free to read two previous columns which prompted healthy discussions around the positives and negatives of Windows 8. Prior to release we asked, “What Do You Really Think Of Windows 8? ” and then in light of poor early sales we asked, “What Should Microsoft Do To Sell Windows 8 To The Masses? ” The comments on both should help nudge you into remembering what you dislike about Windows 8.


Drawing Conclusions


All comments will be digested to form conclusions in a follow-up post next week where we will detail what You Told Us. One reader will be chosen for the coveted Comment Of The Week, getting their name up in lights, the respect of other readers, and 150 MakeUseOf points to use for MakeUseOf Rewards. What more motivation than that do you need to respond?


We Ask You is a weekly column dedicated to finding out the opinions of MakeUseOf readers. The questions asked are usually open-ended and likely to necessitate a discussion. Some are opinion-based, while others see you sharing tips and advice, or advocating tools and apps to fellow MakeUseOf Readers. This column is nothing without you, as MakeUseOf is nothing without you.


Image Credit: Jon Fingas


The post What Changes Do You Want To See In Windows 8.1? [We Ask You] appeared first on MakeUseOf.



Google+ Photo Search With Image Recognition



Last year, Google Drive added an advanced image search feature powered by Goggles that recognizes objects and uses OCR technology to extract text. The same feature is now available in Google+: search for [sunflower], click "More", restrict the results to "Photos" and select "Most recent". You'll find sunflower images from Google+ posts that don't even include "sunflower", not even in the image filename.






This also works for the images you've uploaded to Picasa Web Albums/Google+ Photos or the images uploaded by your circles.









{ via Android Police }